31 Days of Halloween Day 24 – The Evil Dead (1981)

31 Days of Halloween – Day 24

The Evil Dead (directed by Sam Raimi, 1981) It is amazing what you can accomplish with a movie camera, a small budget, and a group of close friends when you put your mind to it. This is essentially how The Evil Dead was made. Director Sam Raimi (Drag Me To Hell), producer Rob Tapert and star Bruce Campbell (Army of Darkness), with some friends, made one of the most memorable horror movies on a budget of just under $400,000 (some films have a budget of over $150,000,000, and they suck). Creativity can go a lot further than money, and this film proves it. Five friends travel to a remote cabin for a little rest and relaxation. While they are there, they discover an ancient book and an old reel player. As they listen to the reel player, they discover that the book is called the Necronomicon, the Sumerian Book of the Dead. The voice on the reel recites some of the text as they listen, and the incantations awaken a sleeping evil in the woods. One by one, the characters are possessed. Can Ash (Bruce Campbell) survive the demons long enough to see the daylight, or will the evil swallow another soul? One thing I really enjoy about Evil Dead is the physical acting that takes place. The action, along with the campy nature of the film almost makes it seem like you are watching a demented episode of the Three Stooges. The last half of the film is basically one long, bloody action sequence. The make-up effects, while walking the fine line of being cheesy, are charming,and have a distinct look, and continue to do so through out the series. There is plenty of gore, dismemberment, sexual assaults by trees, screeching and laughing Deadites (possessed people), and most importantly, Bruce Campbell, to keep you entertained for the duration of the film. It is easy to see why the Evil Dead films, and Army of Darkness, have such an amazing fan base. If you manage to acquire a Blu ray copy, the transfer is very good, and makes the experience better. I loved my VHS copy, but it was shoddy at best.I have always been torn over which Evil Dead, 1 or 2, I like better. Evil Dead 2 is essentially the same movie with better effects, brilliant one-liners, and jacked-up insanity. While it is also a classic, I think I am more impressed with first film. It has a distinct “home-made” element to it that reminds me of being a kid, running around with my friends and a camcorder, making our own horror movies. I had not watched Evil Dead in sometime until this writing. I won’t make that mistake again. Please give the Deadites some love this Halloween. Just don’t read the paperback version out loud, unless you want to fight demons all night.

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Recap

  • Day 1 – The Conjuring
  • Day 2 – You’re Next
  • Day 3 – Rob Zombie’s Halloween
  • Day 4 – Dog Soldiers
  • Day 5 – Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003)
  • Day 6 – Psycho (1960)
  • Day 7 – John Carpenter’s The Thing
  • Day 8 – The Prowler
  • Day 9 – Pet Sematary
  • Day 10 – The Nightmare Before Christmas
  • Day 11 – Near Dark
  • Day 12 – The Lost Boys
  • Day 13 – Child’s Play
  • Day 14 – Sleepy Hollow
  • Day 15 – House of 1,000 Corpses
  • Day 16 – The Devil’s Rejects
  • Day 17 – Night of the Living Dead
  • Day 18 – Dawn of the Dead (’78)
  • Day 19 – Friday the 13th: A New Beginning
  • Day 20 – Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974)
  • Day 21 – The Cabin In The Woods
  • Day 22 – A Nightmare On Elm Street (1984)
  • Day 23 – The Exorcist III
  • Day 24 – The Evil Dead (1981)

T.

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In 50 Words…Tales of Halloween (2015) – A Tiny Review

Tales of Halloween (2015)

Directed by Darren Lynn Bousman and 9 others. Starring Lynn Shaye, Barry Bostwick, Adrianne Barbeau

Epic Pictures Group

A Halloween anthology, consisting of ten mini stories, all taking place in the same town. Creative, funny, and entertaining for the most part. A couple of the stories stand out, including The Night Billy Raised Hell and Trick. My only complaint is that the segment stories could have intertwined more. A solid Halloween movie in the vein of Creepshow and Trick r Treat. Definite chance to see this one turn into a franchise. Decent gore and special effects, with some good atmosphere. More treats than tricks. Twisted Halloween fun.     3.5 out of 5 Bloody Moons
T.

31 Days of Halloween Day 23 – The Exorcit III

31 Days of Halloween – Day 23

The Exorcist III (directed by William Peter Blatty, 1990) When I first wrote out a list of the movies I would blog about for my ’31 Days of Halloween’ series, for day twenty-three, I had James Whale’s 1935 classic Bride of Frankenstein. Bride is probably the best of the Universal Monster movies of the 30’s and 40’s, but it just didn’t seem right to include it on this list. I wanted to give the spot to something that truly scared the hell out of me after seeing it for the first time. Friends and I went to the theater to watch the film, and it immediately had an effect on me. And if that wasn’t enough, no word of a lie, there was a storm and power outage that night. I had to sit in the dark and think about what I just saw, and if the devil was responsible for the lack of electricity on my street. This is why I switched in The Exorcist III as day twenty-three on this list. This movie still gets under my skin. Lieutenant Kinderman (George C. Scott) has been investigating a string of serial murders which share far too many similarities to those of “Gemini Killer”, who has been dead for fifteen years. The current murders contain evidence that only the police knew about during the original series of killings, but what is really puzzling is that the finger prints at each scene are different, making it seem that there are multiple killers at play. The trail leads Kinderman to a psychiatric hospital and what he discovers in Cell 11 will truly test his faith in all that is holy. Exorcist III should be considered the true sequel to the classic 1973 The Exorcist. The film has received average reviews, and admittedly seems to be appreciated more twenty five years later, but I feel it does not get the credit it deserves. The story is actually well crafted, and makes sense. True evil never dies; it just finds another body to hide in. The acting is great lead by George C. Scott, who was always a commanding screen presence. Jason Miller returns as Father Damian Karras, and the always charming Brad Dourif is scary and convincing as the Gemini Killer. The cast of elderly people, who play an important part of the story, are wonderfully creepy. The original is so shocking and blasphemous that it would be hard to even come close to duplicating, but this sequel tries to deliver some genuinely freaky moments. One of the best jump scares of any film, in my opinion, is a long hospital hallway shot that builds for quite a bit, but delivers a satisfying payoff. What frightens me most in horror films is the use of Catholicism and religious symbolism, or demonic possession (if done right), and Exorcist III is chalk full. This Halloween, if you want to see the film that made me (figuratively) wet my pants, watch The Exorcist III. If you do not get the creeps, you can laugh at me.

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Recap

  • Day 1 – The Conjuring
  • Day 2 – You’re Next
  • Day 3 – Rob Zombie’s Halloween
  • Day 4 – Dog Soldiers
  • Day 5 – Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003)
  • Day 6 – Psycho (1960)
  • Day 7 – John Carpenter’s The Thing
  • Day 8 – The Prowler
  • Day 9 – Pet Sematary
  • Day 10 – The Nightmare Before Christmas
  • Day 11 – Near Dark
  • Day 12 – The Lost Boys
  • Day 13 – Child’s Play
  • Day 14 – Sleepy Hollow
  • Day 15 – House of 1,000 Corpses
  • Day 16 – The Devil’s Rejects
  • Day 17 – Night of the Living Dead
  • Day 18 – Dawn of the Dead (’78)
  • Day 19 – Friday the 13th: A New Beginning
  • Day 20 – Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974)
  • Day 21 – The Cabin In The Woods
  • Day 22 – A Nightmare On Elm Street (1984)
  • Day 23 – The Exorcist III

31 Days of Halloween Day 22 – A Nightmare On Elm Street

31 Days of Halloween – Day 22

A Nightmare On Elm Street (directed by Wes Craven, 1984)One, two, Freddy’s coming for you…”  Wes Craven’s greatest film almost never saw the light of day. A Nightmare on Elm Street seemed to be financially doomed during production. An eleventh hour deal with a European production company saved the movie. As it turns out, the box office success of the movie saved New Line Cinema, and birthed one of the most iconic figures in motion picture lore. Freddy Krueger was born. The ghoulish, burnt up man who slashes up the dreams of teenagers with his razor-fingered glove. Along side Jason Voorhees, Michael Myers and Frankenstein, Freddy is a true horror icon. The teenagers of Elm Street are having nightmares, and they all seem to involve a common element; a disfigured man, wearing a hat and a ragged old stripped sweater. As the dreams become reality, and kids begin to die in their sleep, a horrible event in Elm Street’s past come to light. The victims need to stay awake, or they will be next to die. Sequels aside, Nightmare is actually a very intense thriller. Freddy only speaks a few lines of dialogue, and by slasher standards, is not a very menacing figure. That doesn’t matter. What Freddy does have is the ability to manipulate dreams and impose his will in any manner he sees fit. When are we most exposed? In our sleep, of course, and Wes Craven taps into that vulnerability sublimely. Robert Englund plays the character of Freddy so convincingly that no one else will ever fill his shoes. The 2010 remake tried, and failed miserably, to kick-start the franchise again. One of the main reasons is because Jackie Earle Haley, a great actor in his own right, is not Freddy Krueger. Englund is, and always will be the `Springfield Slasher`. Nightmare also boasts some great death scenes. Tina (Amanda Wyss) brutally sliced up while being dragged up and down the walls and ceiling is bloody and beautiful. Glen (Johnny Depp) sucked into his bed, and then spat out in a tide of blood is creative and gory. Heather Langenkamp is effective and innocent as the heroine, Nancy. Some of her nightmares are straight up creepy, for example, when she is in class and sees Tina`s body-bagged corpse in the middle of the hall. The late, great Wes Craven is a master at bringing out the vulnerability in people through uncertainty. In Scream (1996), the characters do not know who the killer is, and that creates fear. For the residents of Elm street, reality and nightmare are blurred, which leads to confusion and dread. His inspiration was taken from articles he read about southeast Asian refuges inexplicably dying after awakening from nightmares. These men were healthy, and the unexplained causes of death intrigues Craven. The numerous sequels take the story off in so many directions that it is hard to take any of them seriously. Without the subsequent chapters, Nightmare would still stand alone as a diamond in the horror movie genre. Thirty years later, Elm Street is still very relevant, and stands up to anything released since its release. If you want an original, smart, and scary treat for a Halloween Netflix night, why not re-live A Nightmare on Elm Street. Just make sure you do not fall asleep.

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Recap

  • Day 1 – The Conjuring
  • Day 2 – You’re Next
  • Day 3 – Rob Zombie’s Halloween
  • Day 4 – Dog Soldiers
  • Day 5 – Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003)
  • Day 6 – Psycho (1960)
  • Day 7 – John Carpenter’s The Thing
  • Day 8 – The Prowler
  • Day 9 – Pet Sematary
  • Day 10 – The Nightmare Before Christmas
  • Day 11 – Near Dark
  • Day 12 – The Lost Boys
  • Day 13 – Child’s Play
  • Day 14 – Sleepy Hollow
  • Day 15 – House of 1,000 Corpses
  • Day 16 – The Devil’s Rejects
  • Day 17 – Night of the Living Dead
  • Day 18 – Dawn of the Dead (’78)
  • Day 19 – Friday the 13th: A New Beginning
  • Day 20 – Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974)
  • Day 21 – The Cabin In The Woods
  • Day 22 – A Nightmare On Elm Street (1984)

T.

In 50 Words…Crimson Peak

Crimson Peak (2015)

Directed by: Guillermo del Toro

Starring: Mia Wasikowska, Tom Hiddleston, Jessica Chastain    Legenday Pictures

Guillermo del Toro’s Crimson Peak is visually amazing, with great cinematography and set design. The special effects are really well done. If you are looking for something scary, this film will not satisfy. Essentially a love story with ghosts, Crimson Peak lacks the chills, although there are defiantly some cringe worthy violent moments. Tom Hiddleston (Thor) and Jessica Chastain (Zero Dark Thirty) are great, but for me, the rest of the film fell a little flat. Still not a bad way to kill a couple hours. 3 / 5 Bloody Moons

31 Days of Halloween Day 21 – The Cabin in the Woods

Cabin in the Woods

31 Days of Halloween – Day 21

The Cabin in the Woods (directed by Drew Goddard, 2012) Once in a while, you come across a movie that thinks outside the box. Horror movies seem to go in genre waves. Whatever is in vogue that particular cycle seems to get beaten to death by Hollywood. Found footage was popular for a while. Vampires have their turn. Slashers get a go. Anything that movie producers throw against the wall, and sticks, is the new flavor of the month. The Cabin in the Woods starts off like any ordinary horror, but takes some big swerves of course through out, and the results are one of the most original films of the genre. I will not go into plot details, because if you have not seen the film, I do not want to spoil it. Five friends set off to spend the weekend in a family cabin. Sound familiar? That’s where the familiarity end. Drew Goddard (writer for World War Z and Cloverfield) and Joss Whedon (TV’s Firefly and Marvel’s The Avengers) wrote the story, while Goddard directed. What they have created is a highly entertaining film, which blends horror and comedy, with enough plot twists to keep you engaged from start to finish. The most recognizable faces are Chris Hemsworth (Thor), Bradley Whitford (TV’s Transparent), and the brilliant Richard Jenkins (Step Brothers). The interaction between Whitford and Jenkins is witty and one of the best parts of the film. I was recommended to see this by a friend, and I am glad I took his advice. The Cabin in the Woods is one of my favorites from the last five years. It reminds me of how great I thought the original Evil Dead was when I first saw it. If you want some Halloween scares with substance, watch The Cabin in the Woods. You will not be disappointed.

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Recap

  • Day 1 – The Conjuring
  • Day 2 – You’re Next
  • Day 3 – Rob Zombie’s Halloween
  • Day 4 – Dog Soldiers
  • Day 5 – Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003)
  • Day 6 – Psycho (1960)
  • Day 7 – John Carpenter’s The Thing
  • Day 8 – The Prowler
  • Day 9 – Pet Sematary
  • Day 10 – The Nightmare Before Christmas
  • Day 11 – Near Dark
  • Day 12 – The Lost Boys
  • Day 13 – Child’s Play
  • Day 14 – Sleepy Hollow
  • Day 15 – House of 1,000 Corpses
  • Day 16 – The Devil’s Rejects
  • Day 17 – Night of the Living Dead
  • Day 18 – Dawn of the Dead (’78)
  • Day 19 – Friday the 13th: A New Beginning
  • Day 20 – Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974)
  • Day 21 – The Cabin In The Woods

T.

31 Days of Halloween Day 20 – TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE (’74)

31 Days of Halloween – Day 20

Texas Chainsaw Massacre (directed by Tobe Hooper, 1974) If I could be part of any horror film in the history of cinema, I would choose Texas Chainsaw Massacre. I feel that TCM is the pinnacle of terror cinema. The film is non-stop, nerve-grinding screaming, yelling, and brutality. You can have all of the torture porn like Saw and Hostel you want. I will take the dirty, stinking Texas summer heat of this Tobe Hooper classic. Leatherface is a man who wears other people’s faces after he hangs them on a hook and butchers them. What is more terrifying than that? Five young adults are traveling through Texas to return to a childhood home. Along the way, they run into an assortment of characters that should have set off one hundred warning bells to get the hell out of there, but they carry on for lack of better judgement. They arrive at the destination, and splinter off into a couple groups. At various points, everyone one of them stumbles upon the Sawyer residence, a creepy farm house. It is here that they meet their premature demise. It turns out that the Sawyers are cannibalistic psychopaths. There are scenes in this film that still wear on my psyche, even though I know what is coming. Every time a victim is hung from a meat hook, I get a sick feeling. Marilyn Burns (Sally Hardesty) does an inspiring job as the terrified lone survivor. After reading trivia about TCM, it seems like the actual production of the movie was far more horrifying than the film itself. The filming was done over twenty some odd days during one of the hottest Texas summers in history. Sounds like guerrilla style film making at it’s finest. Edwin Neil, who starred as Hitchhiker, claimed that filming the movie was worse than his service in Vietnam. That sounds intense, but whatever happened during production aside, these actors were part of something special. Gunnar Hansen was menacing as Leatherface. The moment that metal door slides open, and he emerges, horror movie villains changed forever. Since that point, most mute killers are big and menacing, but no where near the presence of the original Leatherface. Also, you know he meat business, as evident by the tie that he wears under his butcher’s apron. At the risk of sounding like a fan boy, Texas Chainsaw Massacre almost perfect. The only thing I don’t like about the film is the character of Franklin. He is the most annoying asshole of a human being ever. I’m glad he was sawed in half. I feel good inside every time I see it. That aside, Texas Chainsaw Massacre is first class example of how fear should be transposed to the big screen. So, this Halloween, slow cook a roast, put on your favorite lady face, and enjoy a good dose of Leatherface.

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Recap

  • Day 1 – The Conjuring
  • Day 2 – You’re Next
  • Day 3 – Rob Zombie’s Halloween
  • Day 4 – Dog Soldiers
  • Day 5 – Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003)
  • Day 6 – Psycho (1960)
  • Day 7 – John Carpenter’s The Thing
  • Day 8 – The Prowler
  • Day 9 – Pet Sematary
  • Day 10 – The Nightmare Before Christmas
  • Day 11 – Near Dark
  • Day 12 – The Lost Boys
  • Day 13 – Child’s Play
  • Day 14 – Sleepy Hollow
  • Day 15 – House of 1,000 Corpses
  • Day 16 – The Devil’s Rejects
  • Day 17 – Night of the Living Dead
  • Day 18 – Dawn of the Dead (’78)
  • Day 19 – Friday the 13th: A New Beginning
  • Day 20 – Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974)

T.

31 Days of Halloween Day 19 – Friday the 13th: A New Beginning

31 Days of Halloween – Day 19

Friday the 13th: A New Beginning (directed by Danny Steinmann, 1985) I suppose you are wondering why I would choose the fourth sequel of the Friday the 13th franchise as the only Ft13 film on my 31 Days of Halloween list, and why choose the film of the series that does not feature Jason Voorhees (besides the original film, in which mommy was doing the killing)? Well let me tell you why my friends. This is my favorite of the Friday films. Yes, the story is completely lame, even by horror movie standards. There is so much cheese squeezed into this film, it’s like eating a box of Kraft Dinner made with TWO packages of orange power. Yet, I am completely entertained by this film, and know ninety-nine percent of the dialogue by memory. This is my guilty pleasure when it comes to horror movies. After being killed by Tommy Jarvis at the conclusion of Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter, Jason is a fading memory. Except to Tommy, who is now teenager, and living in a halfway home for troubled youth. He is still tormented by Jason through hallucinations and nightmares. After a resident of the home is murdered by a fellow troubled teen, the father (ambulance driver Roy) of the deceased teen dawns the familiar hockey mask and goes on a kill rampage under the disguise of Jason Voorhees. This movie has so many memorable characters and funny scenes that I never get tired of watching it. Victims include a leather-clad rock star named Demon (the incomparable Miguel A. Nunez Jr.) who lives in a van with his girlfriend, a motorcycle riding simpleton and his bitchy mother, a new-age goth girl who dances alone in her room, and a buxom gal who receives hedge clippers through the eyes. A lot of the murder scenes are original and well done, if a little far-fetched. A New Beginning does not have Jason except for a brief dream sequence at the start of the film, but that does not mean it is not a quality entry to the series. Compared to a couple of the sequels, Part V is a cinematic masterpiece. This Halloween, give Roy a chance. His hockey mask might have blue paint checks instead of red, and he may not be an unstoppable ghoul, but there is plenty of Jason to go around for all other occasions.

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Recap

  • Day 1 – The Conjuring
  • Day 2 – You’re Next
  • Day 3 – Rob Zombie’s Halloween
  • Day 4 – Dog Soldiers
  • Day 5 – Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003)
  • Day 6 – Psycho (1960)
  • Day 7 – John Carpenter’s The Thing
  • Day 8 – The Prowler
  • Day 9 – Pet Sematary
  • Day 10 – The Nightmare Before Christmas
  • Day 11 – Near Dark
  • Day 12 – The Lost Boys
  • Day 13 – Child’s Play
  • Day 14 – Sleepy Hollow
  • Day 15 – House of 1,000 Corpses
  • Day 16 – The Devil’s Rejects
  • Day 17 – Night of the Living Dead
  • Day 18 – Dawn of the Dead (’78)
  • Day 19 – Friday the 13th: A New Beginning

31 Days of Halloween Day 18 – Dawn of the Dead (’78)

31 Days of Halloween – Day 18

Dawn of the Dead (directed by George A. Romero, 1978) Though the “sequel” to Night of the Living Dead is much different than it’s predecessor, Dawn of the Dead is still a landmark in the zombie genre. Gruesome, grizzly, violent, and most importantly; fun. I saw this movie when I was seven or eight years old, and it is something that has stuck with me, but not because it scared me. I was completely taken with the special effects. The amount of gun shots, head smashes, ripped off arms, and everything else captured my attention. And imagine going on a long-term shopping spree, and all you have to do is survive the zombie apocalypse? It sounds amazing, unless you get bitten. Four people escape Philadelphia as it is being overrun by the undead. After escaping by helicopter, they take refuge in a shopping mall. Faced with the task of clearing the zombies out of their new home, the group does there best to make their unbelievable situation tolerable. Things begin to unravel, and everything culminates in a battle with an outlaw biker gang who have come to pillage the mall. The role of Peter, played by the bad ass Ken Foree, is one of my all-time favorite horror movie heroes. Peter is the perfect mix of serious and funny, and Foree has great timing with his dialogue. Monster make-up effects wizard Tom Savini does double duty as the films make-up artist, as well as playing the role of the leader of the motorcycle gang. Dawn of the Dead has the same feel as a lot of the great films made in the late 70’s; a great synthesizer soundtrack, tough but vulnerable characters, a great special effects. George Romero did his best to keep the tone of Night of the Living Dead serious, so with Dawn, it feels like he tried to have a little fun with a larger budget. Mission accomplished. Dawn of the Dead is a quintessential zombie movie, so it should also be mandatory Halloween viewing. Even if human flesh isn’t your thing, try it. You might like it.

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Recap

  • Day 1 – The Conjuring
  • Day 2 – You’re Next
  • Day 3 – Rob Zombie’s Halloween
  • Day 4 – Dog Soldiers
  • Day 5 – Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003)
  • Day 6 – Psycho (1960)
  • Day 7 – John Carpenter’s The Thing
  • Day 8 – The Prowler
  • Day 9 – Pet Sematary
  • Day 10 – The Nightmare Before Christmas
  • Day 11 – Near Dark
  • Day 12 – The Lost Boys
  • Day 13 – Child’s Play
  • Day 14 – Sleepy Hollow
  • Day 15 – House of 1,000 Corpses
  • Day 16 – The Devil’s Rejects
  • Day 17 – Night of the Living Dead
  • Day 18 – Dawn of the Dead (’78)

T.

31 Days of Halloween Day 17 – NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD

31 Days of Halloween – Day 17

Night of the Living Dead (directed by George A. Romero, 1968) These days, the Zombie genre is all the rage. The Walking Dead, 28 Days Later, Zombieland, and World War Z are all capitalizing on the concept that the dead shall roam the earth. What we sometimes forget is that the success of these franchises can all be attributed to one simple black and white classic; George A. Romero’s Night of the Living Dead. Why do zombies travel in slow moving, thoughtless packs? It’s because Romero zombies did. Why do zombies feast on the flesh of the living? It’s because Romero zombies did. In my eyes, no film has shaped the present state of modern horror more than Night of the Living Dead. Think about it; people are crazy over television show The Walking Dead. Basically, TWD is Night of the Living Dead on steroids. It is the same concept of survival against hordes of zombies, and each other, but with a bigger budget. Barbara and her brother Johnny are visiting their father’s grave in a countryside cemetery. They are attack by zombies, but Barbara manages to make it out alive. She finds refuge in an abandoned farm house, where she is joined by Ben, who is in search of gas. Ben tries to secure the house from the onslaught of the undead, who are gathering by the minute. Besides surviving the zombies, they also have to survive conflict within the house when a group of people emerge from hiding in the basement. Radio broadcasts paint a grim picture of the outside world, but the people trapped in the farmhouse have faith that they can survive until help arrives. This film must have been shocking to viewers upon its release. What is more disturbing than cannibalism? The film was deemed as containing explicit gore. Imagine if it had been shot in color. Romero was forced to film on black and white film because of budget, but that is a good thing looking back. The budget restraints gave the film a ‘documentary’ type feel, which makes it seem more real. The use of the radio broadcast dialogue, acting as a type of narration, also gave it realism. The main cast, Duane Jones (Ben) and Judith O’Dea (Barbara) were great choices, being unknown actors, because recognizable actors would have taken away from the naturalness of the movie. For a night of true classic, no smoke and mirrors horror pleasure, make room for Night of the Living Dead during this Halloween season. And remember, if attack by zombies; “Beat ‘em or burn ‘em. They go up pretty easy”.

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Recap

  • Day 1 – The Conjuring
  • Day 2 – You’re Next
  • Day 3 – Rob Zombie’s Halloween
  • Day 4 – Dog Soldiers
  • Day 5 – Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003)
  • Day 6 – Psycho (1960)
  • Day 7 – John Carpenter’s The Thing
  • Day 8 – The Prowler
  • Day 9 – Pet Sematary
  • Day 10 – The Nightmare Before Christmas
  • Day 11 – Near Dark
  • Day 12 – The Lost Boys
  • Day 13 – Child’s Play
  • Day 14 – Sleepy Hollow
  • Day 15 – House of 1,000 Corpses
  • Day 16 – The Devil’s Rejects
  • Day 17 – Night of the Living Dead