Daily Tonality: Song of the Day 01/07/2018

January 7, 2018

Today’s song is brought to you by putting my Spotify library on random and making the first song to play your Daily Tonality.

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Mark Lanegan – The Gravedigger’s Song (from the album Blues Funeral, 2012) Sometimes it seems like my Spotify account can read my soul. Last night, I had this song playing in my head for a little while. Today, as I do the magic shuffle to get the song of the day, BAM…The Gravedigger’s Song appears. Mark Lanegan is an amazing songwriter, and the gravely, ghostly voice to perfectly showcase the subject matter. This song has a driving bass line and tempo, accompanied by a rich, reverb filled guitar landscape. It’s beautiful. If you don’t like the song, your ears are probably fucked up and you should have them tested. The whole Blues Funeral album is the perfect highway soundtrack. It would be easy to get lost in the music and miss your exit.

Little factLanegan was part of Screaming Trees, one of Seattle’s early grunge bands, and has collaborated with Queens of the Stone Age, and Isobel Campbell (Belle and Sebastian).

T.

 

 

12 Riffs of Christmas – Lemmy, Gibbons & Grohl – Run, Run Rudolph

2392387-2392384-lemmy_santa-jpgLemmy, Billy F. Gibbons and Dave GrohlRun, Run Rudolph (from the compilation We Wish You A Metal Xmas And A Headbanging New Year, 2008 Armoury Records  – First recorded by the legendary Chuck Berry in 1958, Run, Run Rudolph has been recorded by many musicians over the years. The others are okay, but you cannot compete with Lemmy Kilmister (Motorhead), especially when he is joined by underrated guitar legend Billy F. Gibbons (ZZ Top), and all-round good dude Dave Grohl (Foo Fighters). This is Christmas, Sunset Strip meets Mississippi Delta style; with snarl and attitude. The only regretful thing about this collaboration is that they didn’t make a whole album of Holiday songs. If you had an opportunity to record a Christmas song with a select group ofmusicians, who would you choose, and what song would you do? I choose White Christmas with Joshua Homme (QOTSA) and Tom Waits. Just imagine…

T.

 

In 50 Words… Redemption of the Devil (2015)

In 50 (or so) Words

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Redemption of the Devil (2015)
Directed by: Alex Hoffman
Starring: Jesse Hughes
Vice Media

This documentary follows a year in the life of charismatic front man for the band Eagles of Death Metal, Jesse Hughes. He is many things; wild-man, political activist, worshiper of women, ordained minister, and father. Leading up to Hughes’, aka Boots Electric, fortieth birthday, he is preparing to record a new album, play solo shows, record his radio shows, and most importantly, trying to reconnect with his son.

As a big fan of EODM, I was looking forward to watching Redemption of the Devil. To me, Jesse Hughes has always come off as a cock-sure and confident rock n’ roller, with a desire to live up to the legend that comes along with that lifestyle. He is that, and so much more. The film is very candid, and of course there are moments that it seems the man called “Boots Electric” is playing it up for the camera. After watching, I don’t believe that is the case. Hughes has a bombastic personality, and his views and opinions mirror that. There is also another side to Jesse Hughes; devoted son who honors his mother’s beliefs by becoming an ordained minister, as he tries to tone down his hedonistic ways. He is also a tortured father, who desperately wants to see his son after being estranged for a year. At some points during the film, I thought to myself how amazing it would be to live this lifestyle, which were counter-balanced by the realization that things can sometimes slip through your fingers and the fun is not all it is cracked up to be. I really enjoyed Redemption of the Devil, and because of this, I see “Boots Electric” as a human being, and not just the charismatic wild-man you see on stage.

4 Bloody Moons

4/5 Bloody Moons

T.